Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Antsy

Antsy - impatient and unable to keep still; nervous about what might happen.

Example - "After a few minutes in the restaurant, the kids got antsy"

Image - http://cdn.quotationof.com/images/antsy-quotes-4.jpg

Frame of mind

Frame of mind - a particular mood that influences one's attitude or behaviour.

Example - "He was in a relaxed frame of mind"

Image - http://izquotes.com/quotes-pictures/quote-professionalism-is-a-frame-of-mind-not-a-paycheck-cecil-castle-292453.jpg

Neither here nor there

Neither here nor there - of no consequence or meaning, irrelevant and immaterial.

Example - "Whether you go to the movie or stay at home is neither here nor there"
                  "Your comment, though interesting, is neither here nor there"

Image - http://ungrind.org/wp-content/uploads/6a00e0099410db88330115708f1853970b-450wi.jpg



To figure on someone or something

To figure on someone or something -  to count on someone or something; to assume something about someone or something.

Example - "I'm figuring on 12 people for dinner next Saturday"

Image - https://figure1.com/assets/img/figure1logo@2x.png

Catch-22

Catch-22 - a dilemma or difficult circumstance from which there is no escape because of mutually conflicting or dependent conditions.

Example - "The choice you're giving me is a catch-22 because, no matter which option I choose, I'm not going to be happy with either one."

Image - http://boardofwisdom.com/cachetogo/images/quotes/608430.png

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

To chance one's arm

To chance one's arm - to take a risk in order to get something that you want.

Example - "Aren't you chancing your arm a bit giving up a secure job to start up a business?


Image - https://timitude.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/take-a-chance.jpg

Eugenics

Eugenics - a science that deals with the improvement (as by control of human mating) of hereditary qualities of a race or breed.


Image - http://www.cbc-network.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/eugenics.jpg

Stir-crazy

Stir-crazy - restless or frantic because of confinement.

Example - "She'd be in danger of going stir-crazy if she had to look at the same four walls any longer"


Image - https://i.ytimg.com/vi/VMJzjZZbP1Y/maxresdefault.jpg

Out of the frying pan into the fire

Out of the frying pan into the fire - from a bad situation to a worst situation.

Example - "When I tried to argue about my fine for a traffic violation, the judge charged me with contempt of court. I really went out of the frying pan into the fire"

Image - http://www.babypips.com/images/blogs/piponomics/images/110803/panfry.png

To consort with someone

To consort with someone - to associate with someone.

Example - "It is said that she consorts with thieves"

Image - http://img.picturequotes.com/2/178/177910/all-intellectual-tendencies-are-corrupted-when-they-consort-with-power-quote-1.jpg

Monday, February 22, 2016

To factor something in

To factor something in - to include something when you are doing a calculation.

Example - "People are earning more, but when inflation is factored in, they are no better off.

Image - https://tctechcrunch2011.files.wordpress.com/2014/12/canstockphoto6007776.jpg?w=738

To knock something on the head

To knock something on the head - to prevent something from happening, or to finally finish something.

Example - "It's nearly done. Another couple of hours and should knock it on the head"

Image - http://assets.hardwaresphere.com/uploads/2008/08/i-knock-im-notifier.jpg

To cajole

To cajole - to persuade by flattery or promised.

Example - "He hoped to cajole her into selling him her house"

Image - https://i.ytimg.com/vi/NwJGf6dbduY/maxresdefault.jpg

Wouldn't touch something with a bargepole

Wouldn't touch something with a bargepole - used to mean that you certainly do not want to buy something or be involved with something; expression used to show strong objection to a proposal.


Image - http://www.phrases.org.uk/images/punting.jpg

To give someone or something a wide berth

To give someone or something a wide berth - to keep a reasonable distance from someone or something.

Example - "The dog we are approaching is very mean. Better give it a wide berth"

Image - https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5166/5244538633_6290272ed6_z_d.jpg

To do someone's head in

To do someone's head in - to make someone feel confused or unhappy

Example - "My relationship with my publicist was doing my head in"

                  "Getting up at 4 o'clock every morning was doing my head in"

Image - http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-kLZDdXtPBiE/U1wg1veVy2I/AAAAAAAAC5w/GGxJ0FC6TRQ/s1600/53640-ml-64848.jpg


Fit-up

Fit-up - to make it seem that someone is guilty of a crime when they're not.

Example - "Of course she didn't do it. Someone fitted her up"

Image - https://i.ytimg.com/vi/qiQswV2UdJM/maxresdefault.jpg

To splash out on

To splash out on - to spend money freely.

Example - "She splashed out on a Mercedes"

Image - http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2015/09/01/23/1ACF04D800000578-0-image-a-1_1441147485934.jpg

To rustle up

To rustle up - to manage to prepare a meal, perhaps on short notice.

Example - "I think I can rustle something up for dinner"

Image - http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/08/20/article-2028136-0D787B0000000578-60_468x373.jpg

Well-heeled

Well-heeled - wealthy.



Image - http://o.aolcdn.com/dims-shared/dims3/GLOB/crop/4752x2597+0+4/resize/604x327/format/jpg/quality/85/http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/adam/e6abeac5d6fdfc2b5004565ff8251b08/145881608.jpg

To coo over

To coo over - to talk fondly or amorously in murmurs.

Example - "The visitors cooed over the newborn babies"

Image - http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2016/02/02/15/30CF7D1C00000578-0-image-a-135_1454426887031.jpg

To sidle up

To sidle up - to move closer to someone or something cautiously or furtively.

Example - "Ted sidled up to Mary and said howdy in a shy voice"

Image - https://breathlesssurvival.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/pmai_4.png?w=290

Sunday, February 21, 2016

To loom

To loom - of something unwanted or unpleasant about to happen soon.

Example - "There is a serious crisis looming"

Image - http://www.jarofquotes.com/img/quotes/c300561918dfccf204daf2ca028992c9.jpg

Bargaining chip

Bargaining chip - something that can be used to gain an advantage when you are trying to make a deal or an agreement.

Example - "The workers used the threat of a strike as a bargaining chip in their negotiations"

Image - http://img1.cdn.tradew.com/Y201308M1552805C1754754/T6G4060321/W499H499/HF+RFID+Bargaining+chip+C-1041.jpg



To be in over one's head

To be in over one's head - to be involved in a difficult situation that you cannot get out of.

Example - "Sean tried to pay his gambling debts but he was in over his head"

Image - https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/15/f1/61/15f1619826d5d3734f7d86e53e5ed119.jpg

To go out on a limb

To go out on a limb - having an opinion that is different from most people's and is unpopular.

Example - "She's going out on a limb in criticizing her own party leadership"

Image - http://www.boardofwisdom.com/cachetogo/images/quotes/269053.png

You've got another think coming

You've got another think coming - you will have to rethink your position.

Example - ""If you think I'm going to stay right here and listen to your complaining all day, you've got another think coming"

Image - http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ZP8jBQOaDRU/Vq-m-YWgG_I/AAAAAAAAXss/hyklRa7QtvE/s320/you%2527ve%2Bgot%2Banother%2Bthink%2Bcoming..JPG



All bets are off

All bets are off - the outcomes of a situation are unpredictable.

Example - "When they get lonely, all bets are off"

Image - https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/70/c6/c5/70c6c52f3b383d6fd1f709e49ebed96f.jpg

Different strokes for different folks

Different strokes for different folks - different people like different things.

Example - "My neighbor spends all of his free time working in his garden. I would never want to do that, but different strokes for different folks."



Image - http://www.englishbaby.com/dynamic/vocab_word/flashcard_image/0000/0000/0006/6789_1362705502_163802.png

By the skin of one's teeth

By the skin of one's teeth - narrowly; barely.

Example - "He escaped from the secret police by the skin of his teeth"

Image - https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/96/29/34/962934bfddfec8deb30d9acf563f2c77.jpg

Friday, February 19, 2016

To clean up your act

To clean up your act - to improve your behaviour.

Example - "He used to drink a lot, but he seems to have cleaned up his act"

Image - http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-2Ra3IKFrlhE/VQTcC7mpYcI/AAAAAAAA5HM/ooJlWk73_dA/s1600/DIY-Clean-Up-Your-Act-Punishment-Jar-Craft.jpeg



Rough around the edges

Rough around the edges - having a few imperfections.

Example - "I'm afraid your article is still rough around the edges"

Image - https://i.ytimg.com/vi/4pnSmd6jZPQ/maxresdefault.jpg

To no avail

To no avail - with no effect, unsuccessful. 

Example - "All my efforts were to no avail"

Image - http://www.jarofquotes.com/img/quotes/8679f602427cd083a6e6dc3a3e72d528.jpg

To take notice of

To take notice of - to pay attention to.

Example - "I'll try to make her take notice of me"

Image - http://5b2014.lowerplace.net/files/2015/05/015c74b06779fe8d8496d585fb9865ea.jpg

On principle

On principle - according to a moral rule or a personal belief.

Example - "He opposed the death penalty on principle"

Image - http://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/quote-always-stand-on-principle-even-if-you-stand-alone-john-adams-36-44-57.jpg

To make a beeline for someone or something

To make a beeline for someone or something - to head straight toward someone or something.

Example - "Billy came into the kitchen and made a beeline for the cookies"

Image - https://learningenglishmatters.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/slide11.jpg

Dig your heels in

Dig your heels in - to refuse to change your plans or ideas, especially when someone is trying to persuade you to do so.

Example - "The more we argued, the more she dug her heels in"

Image - https://freeenglishmaterialsforyou.files.wordpress.com/2015/04/dig_in_your_heels.png?w=640

Askance

Askance - with an attitude or look of suspicion or disapproval.

Example - "The reformers looked askance at the mystical tradition.

Image - https://i.ytimg.com/vi/m1OrR8HB22U/maxresdefault.jpg

Game, set and match

Game, set and match - used to indicate a decisive victory.

Example - "The trade unions have won - game, set and match to the workers"

Image - https://s3.amazonaws.com/rapgenius/game_set_match.jpg

To be in a real state

To be in a real state - to be very nervous or worried.

Example - "She was out all night and her parents were in a real state"

Image - http://nervousspeaker.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/fisheye_nervous_iStock_000003688168Medium1-900x300.jpg

If worst comes to worst

If worst comes to worst - if the worst possible thing should happen.

Example - "We should be able to catch the 4:30 train, but if the worst comes to worst, we could get a taxi and still get into town on time.

Image - http://boardofwisdom.com/cachetogo/images/quotes/139265.png

Thursday, February 18, 2016

To eke something out

To eke something out - to use something slowly or carefully because you only have a very small amount of it.

Example - "There wasn't much food left, but we managed to eke it out."

Image - https://i.ytimg.com/vi/nc2phoEGZjY/maxresdefault.jpg

To stop in one's tracks

To stop in one's tracks - to suddenly stop moving or doing something.

Example - "When I heard the loud scream, I stopped dead in my tracks"

Image - http://edmontonenglishschool-learningenglishonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Idiom-STOP-DEAD-IN-ONES-TRACKS-EdmontonEnglishSchool.png

To put something on the back burner

To put something on the back burner - to put something on hold or suspended temporarily.

Example - "The matter was on the back burner for a long time"

Image - https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/77/62/18/7762187e1a91bde0b0e76d7319b5a5d6.jpg

To fall by the wayside

To fall by the wayside - to stop trying; to no longer be active.

Example - "A lot of students fall by the wayside during their first year at university"

Image - http://supersavingtips.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/healthy-lifestyle-habits.jpg

To stand one's grounds

To stand one's grounds - to refuse to be pushed backwards, or to continue in your beliefs in an argument.

Example - "Clare stood her ground in the meeting and refused to be intimidated even when Michel got angry"

Image - http://www.jarofquotes.com/img/quotes/0c9bb77ea88f4891ae1d61685ba576af.jpg

Outlet

Outlet - a means of release, as for energies, drives or desires.

Example - "This has been an outlet for frustration to me"

Image - http://www.jarofquotes.com/img/quotes/d63e0356c130720befcad54c1fc5d834.jpg

Second nature to someone

Second nature to someone - easy and natural for someone.

Example - "Swimming is second nature to Jane"

Image - http://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/quote-over-time-as-the-daily-routines-become-second-nature-discipline-morphs-into-habit-twyla-tharp-104-45-02.jpg

Volley

Volley - a lot of questions, insults, etc all spoken or made at the same time.

Example - "I always received a volley of abuse whilst I was busking"

Image - http://static3.businessinsider.com/image/52a626436bb3f70905327d8a-1200-900/swear%20words.jpg

To look after number one

To look after number one - to take care of oneself first.

Example - "You gotta look after number one, right?"

Image - http://image.slidesharecdn.com/aicppt-130221045439-phpapp01/95/an-inspector-calls-gcse-8-638.jpg?cb=1361422602

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